PEUGEOT BOXER 1.9Ltr Diesel Engine Page 19

 

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 To contact brian ,
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These pages are dedicated to my experiences of the Peugeot Boxer, 1.9Ltr Turbo Diesel engine and not definitive advise. 

Keep forgetting your MOT, then this site will remind you:
http://auto-reminder.co.uk/

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As author and maintainer of this web site. I do not save, retain, or sell  any email addresses of those who email me. Should you not get a reply from me, please send again, I might have missed it in my spam catcher!

New additions 2010: 

Fitting a Turbo Boost Gauge

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Contents:

1. Removal and replacing the Radiator. 2. Pictures of the removal/installation
3. Update Oct. 2011 for removal and installation of Radiator


REMOVING/REPLACING THE RADIATOR

Before you follow my narrative below on changing the radiator, see the email I received from Rodger:

Hello Brian,
Came across your very interesting site after 'googling' in desperation for info on replacing the radiator on my Boxer based Autosleeper. Your site seems to be the only motorhome site that gives any info at all on this.

It turns out that mine being the next later model  from yours (2003 in fact but  still the same basic shape ) that the radiator that I have just replaced is somewhat easier than the posted method of removing the bumper etc.

After removing the power steering container bracket and the fuse box holding bracket it basically provides just enough room to extract the old rad out complete with cooling fans attached upwards from the engine compartment.

There is just a plastic blanking plate to the left to simply unscrew in addition and the fans have simple connector blocks by the way.

This was in the end much simpler than your earlier model sounds for this fortunately for me ! 

If anyone is stuck on the 2003 model range feel free to contact me for any more precise info.

Kind regards  Roger

Rodger can be found at: rkmdisplays[at]talktalk.net

 

Boxer Radiator Fans, Thermostat Switch, and Relay Container.

At each corner of the fans, they are secured with 10mm bolts


Update Nov 2011

Changing the Radiator

The information described below was carried out as I had no other information at the time. Since then I have installed another radiator, 9 years later.

This time I have found an easier method prompted by Rodger's email, but I still had to remove the fans!.

Raise the Motorhome on to front wheel ramps. Just in case you have to get underneath.

 Below the bonnet catch is the bonnet trim, secured by four self tapping screws. Remove these. The trim is secured either edge with pillars into plastic bases, pull out and place the trim in a safe place.

Remove the air input pipe to the air filter, which is secured with 13mm bolts on the top cross member and a jubilee clip at the air filter.

Take off the bolts which secure the power steering reservoir. Move it one side and tie it up securely.

The white hydraulic headlamp adjuster pipe runs along the top of the radiator. take it out of the black plastic securing brackets and tie out of the way. Remove these brackets and store safely. [ These brackets can be very stiff to remove. Try a 'Pry' bar.] The centre of the brackets have to be pushed out, when being replaced as they are secured by pushing in again, with a hammer. You might get away with it by not removing them!

When the above brackets are removed, the draught excluder cover plate, on top of the radiator, can be removed.

Remove the the 'L' brackets off the top of the Rad.

Remove the 'L' bracket on the left of the Rad. supporting the Turbo cooler.

 At the bottom of the rad. to the right, Looking at it from the front of the van, remove the electric cables which are attached to the thermostat switch. The plug is held on with a lever clip, which is pressed out while removing this plug.

Remove bolts securing the fans. They are located on each corner of the fan supports, lower them to the floor. You might have to remove cables held by bracket holders, which run across the cross member, to allow the fans to drop down. I found it was not necessary to remove the electric cables attached to the fans. Reducing assembly problems.

 If you want to save the antifreeze, remove the 'Radiator Drain Point plug' and catch the liquid in a bucket.  [See picture below for location, but I found it difficult to work on.]

Remove the 3 pipes from the radiator.

Remove all the bolts which secure the radiator to the frame.

I removed the bonnet securing lever clip, as it was protruding in and reduced the space for removing.

 Remove the radiator from the top.  This will require some 'juggling' but is possible, I was able to do it.

Remember to remove the Fan control thermostat switch at the bottom of the Rad. for placing into the new one.

See below for pictures which are still applicable. It is almost the same but the bumper assemblies were not removed.

Since removing the radiator I dis- assembled it, only to find all the tubes were clear. I must now find out why the engine is overheating on long hills in the South of France. Possibly the thermostat and Water temperature sensor are faulty.

When adding anti-freeze, the bottle advises 50% mixture for UK weather. It also advises washing out the system with ordinary water before adding the anti-freeze. I have found it is possible to purchase ready mixed ant-freeze, but it is cheaper to buy the un-mixed as it is the same price as the ready mixed.

See: peug2.htm for hints on anti-freeze change.

Changing the radiator
[This is the old way]

An email from a Norway reader suggested a  cure for overheating symptoms, was to change the radiator.

A radiator was purchased, as I decided to do the job myself.

Around the radiator there are a lot of bits and pieces. When these are removed place them safely for the re-installation.

First remove the plastic cover which can found inside the wheel arches to the front, on both sides. There are 5 self tapping screws into the chassis and three 'Fir Tree' retainers into the wheel arch bumper.

Inside the plastic cover is also a tubed bracket securing the bumper to the chassis. Remove this also on both sides.

Below the bonnet catch is the bonnet trim, secured by four self tapping screws. Remove these. The trim is secured either edge with pillars into plastic bases, pull out and place the trim in a safe place.

Below the removed trim can be seen the three nuts securing the top part of the bumper, remove them.

At the base of the bumper can located two 35mm diameter round insert covers. Remove them and underneath can be seen the large bolts which secure the bumper to the chassis base, remove these.

The bumper can now be pulled forward and removed. Note the top hat slide on, securing fixtures at the side of the chassis each side. When replacing the bumper, it is fitted on these items and the bumper is pushed in like a draw.

For ease of working, parts are moved out of the way, see below: 

Take off the bolts which secure the power steering reservoir. Move it one side and tie it up.

Remove the air input pipe to the air filter, which is secured on the top cross member.

The white hydraulic headlamp adjuster pipe runs along the top of the radiator. take it out of the securing brackets and tie out of the way. Remove these brackets and store safely. [ These brackets can be very stiff to remove. Try a 'Pry' bar.] The centre of the brackets have to be pushed out, when replaced they are secured by pushing in again, with a hammer. You might get away with it by not removing them!

When the above brackets are removed, the draught excluder cover plate, on top of the radiator, can be removed.

Remove the the 'L' brackets off the top of the Rad.

Remove the 'L' bracket on the left of the Rad. supporting the Turbo cooler.

At the bottom right of the rad. to the right, remove the electric cables which are attached to the thermostat switch. The plug is held on with a lever clip which is pressed out while removing.

Take off the fans and allow them to hang behind the rad. They are taken of by removing the two bolts top and bottom on each fan casing. I found it was not necessary to remove the electric cables attached to the fans. Reducing assembly problems. If the cables stretch and the fans don't rest on the floor. Take out the cables from the tie clamps. this will give plenty of slack.

At the left side of the rad. at it's base, can be seen a plug with a flat head screwdriver indent. This can be unscrewed and removed to drain the radiator from this point. Have a bucket ready to save the fluid for re-install or dumping.

Flat Head Screwdriver Plug

Flat Head Screwdriver Plug seen on the right.

At the left side of the rad. can be seen the expansion pipe from the left of the Rad. to the expansion Tank. Clamp this pipe to ensure minimum loss of Antifreeze and remove from the rad.  If you have a pipe which is the same size, place on the output and place in a bucket to catch the antifreeze which will come out of the rad. This will apply if you have not drained the radiator.

Clamp both 42mm diameter pipes from the top and bottom of the rad. and remove from the rad. Secure in a high position to reduce any Antifreeze loss and introducing air bubbles to the system.

Lift the rad. then pull the rad base to the front and remove from the bottom, over the lower cross member. Watch for the two rubber support inserts which will come out with the rad. from the lower cross member. They are required for the re-install. [ Take the opportunity to check the cross member for rust damage. ]

Remove the thermostat switch from the old rad and fit into the new rad. If you are a convenient location, i.e. at home, dip the thermostat switch into boiling water and note, with a multimeter if the device switches. The device spades are in a 'T' formation. The bottom spade is common.

It is possible the expansion pipe input on the rad. is not fitted, but is a separate item delivered with the rad, this has to be screwed in. Other wise remove from the old rad. and refit into the new.

Replace the new rad in reverse order of removal.

When all is assembled, see peug2.htm  http://ourwanderer.org/photogal/thermostathousing.htm  remove the 13. Blanking Bolt. Draining the block during antifreeze filling, until bubbles are cleared.  Fill the expansion tank slowly with about 3 litres of neat Antifreeze, suitable for the Boxer. Start the engine and continue slowly filling the expansion tank with water only. Rev the engine and top up if necessary. Allow the engine to run and get hot, checking the expansion tank levels.  Allow the engine to cool down, about an hour. I then run the van for 40 miles to ensure there was no overheating and any rad. water loss.

Having adopted the above instructions I had no air bubbles and the Boxer performed without any problems.

Click the pictures for a larger image:

Expansion pipe to the expansion radiator tank

Expansion pipe, from radiator to the radiator expansion tank.

Expansion pipe from rad. seen on the right of expansion tank

Expansion pipe from rad. seen on the right of expansion tank

Side view of components removed while carrying out Radiator removal

Side view of components removed while carrying out Radiator removal

Trim below bonnet showing how it is secured at each side

Trim below bonnet showing how it is secured at each side

The trim panel covers found under the wheel arches.

Bumper securing tube for the Boxer

Under the trim panel is the Bumper securing tube.

Radiator ready for removal, over front of lower cross member

Would seem the bumper was sprayed while while in situ! Could this have been the reason for poor cooling fault!

Radiator ready for removal, over front of lower cross member.

Radiator ready for removal, over front of lower cross member.

New radiator in fitted position, with the Turbo Intercooler on the left.

New radiator in fitted position

Another view of the new radiator in fitted position.

Radiator Link

Removed Radiator & New Radiator with sizes for matching

Trim below bonnet removed for radiaror work

Trim on bonnet ready for re-installation

An email from a mechanic informed me I was doing it the hard way. Its not necessary to remove all  the fittings as I have described above. The radiator can be removed by lifting it up and out, having removed the fans 1st.
As always, if there is a hard way I will find it!

See above: 'UPDATE' Changing the Radiator'

Go on a run (10 miles) - park with the front of the vehicle close to a wall (or sheltered from the wind). Leave it idling with the heater off. After a few minutes (anything from 5 to 15) the cooling fan should come on for a minute or two. This tells you the fan is okay. Now lift the bonnet and feel the bottom hose - you should feel it getting warmer before the fan comes on again (no air flowing thro' rad = no cooling). This tells you water is flowing okay. [ In fact doing this test I could not feel a lot of difference with the heat from the top and bottom hoses, indicating a good flow through. ]

Leaving it alone isn't necessarily the best thing to do. Do you know when the coolant was last changed? You should be changing it every 2 yrs using  the BLUE coloured type (unless you're using long life antifreeze so it could be up to 5 yrs using the RED type. ) If the antifreeze is significantly older than it should be, it could be prone to internal corrosion which basically means you are storing up trouble. Internal corrosion cuts the cooling efficiency dramatically - going to a hot climate will increase the likely hood of this causing an overheating problem or leaks or both.

I think the work COLD is being harshly misused here for the bottom hose - the word you are looking for is cooler, that is to say cooler in relation to the top hose. If the top hose is very hot then the bottom hose will be hot.

A good way to check the radiator is first visually - no holes, funny green/white patches - and no water (well duh !!!) - also, when the van is at normal operating temp, use the palm of you hand to check for any "hot spots"

thirdly, check the water - should be a misty colour - dependant on anti-freeze/coolant.

 


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